‘Paradise’ Ana Serrano van Der Laan (Ana Laan) ~ iTunes Single of the Week

The iTunes free song of the week is called by "Paradise" Ana Serrano van der Laan.  Here’s the album artwork displaying an apparent internal paradise she’s magically in:

20080305-Ana-Laan-Chocolate-and-Roses

It’s from her album called Chocolate and Roses.  That picture looks like it’s somewhere in Arizona maybe (probably not Palm Springs).

The song "Paradise" itself deserves not a long review.  Its sound is plump and pretty fun, but it has a hard time breaking away.  It actually comes across as a little trite, like Paris Hilton’s "reggae" song "Stars Are Blind," but with an almost sexy accent.  I will probably listen to both on occasion.  I like feeling mindless aural sensations sometimes.

The song essentially is about how she’d love to be in paradise, but being there with her lover pretty much tops any other place.  I have a feeling that we’re going to be bombarded for many years to come by young artists who can’t break out of the paradise trap.  It doesn’t mean that their work can’t be fun and inspired.

Take MGMT for example.  Their song "Time to Pretend" has cliche anti-cliche lyrics (striking out against the excess and glamour of rockdom) and lots of beaches/surfboarding in the video, but the underpinnings of musical creativity are there.  I’ve put the album on repeat more than once.  There’s hope for at least some of the artists.  As for Ana, get "Paradise" while it’s free.

Here are the lyrics [comments in brackets]:

Ba ba ba bup bup ba da ba bup
Ba ba ba bup bup ba da ba bup
Ba ba ba bup bup ba da ba bup
Ba ba ba bup bup ba da ba bup
Ba ba ba bup bup ba da ba bup
Ba ba ba bup bup ba da ba bup
Ba ba ba bup bup ba da ba bup
Baaaaaaaa

[This part seems like it’s coming from a sheep, but it’s actually quite fun with the accompanying music.]

Please don’t talk
My mind is out for a walk
Just go on touching me

[Please don’t sing.  We’re all too busy looking at those things.  Just keep on showing your legs.]

Feel your way
Baby make my day
Just go on touching me

[A lot of people would take her up on this offer.]

Paradise sounds pretty nice
But nothing could be better than this
Nothing could be better than this

[This song?  Or the sex act you’re describing to us?]

Hold me tight
Honey you’re getting it right
Just keep on loving me

[This is actually getting a little graphic.  Either that or I have a sick imagination.]

Don’t be shy
Your clever hands don’t lie
Please please keep on loving me

[Nope.  Not my imagination.]

Istanbul sounds wonderful
But nothing could be better than this
Nothing could be better than this

[Istanbul was Constantinople.  Now it’s Istanbul.  It’s still a great city too.]

[Here comes an incomprehensible but lovely romance language.  Something about knees, cash and Costa Rica.]

Money my knee
Costa Rica esta bueno money ma knee

[This part sounds a lot like the Camerounaise named Sally Nyolo.  If you like the multi-lingual sound of this part of the song, check her out.]

Bup bup ba bud budda bup
Bup bup ba bud budda bup
Ba ba ba bup bup ba da ba bup
Ba ba ba bup bup ba da ba bup
Ba ba ba bup bup ba da ba bup
Ba ba ba bup bup ba da ba bup
Ba ba ba bup bup ba da ba bup
Ba ba ba bup bup ba da ba bup
Ba ba ba bup bup ba da ba bup
Ba ba ba bup bup ba da ba bup
Baaaaaaaaaaaa

[I promise this part sounds better to music.  No farm animals.]

Take your time
Hot and slow is fine
Lay your hands all over me

[She might actually say "hard and slow" here, but I can’t tell.  It’s the accent.]

Make it last
There’s no need to go fast
Just lay your hands on me

[I’m guessing that she likes to tell her partners what to do in bed.]

Hollywood sounds pretty good
But nothing could be better than this
Oh no, baby
Nothing could be better this

[Hollywood is actually probably not a great place for a woman like you.]

Your clever hands never lie
Nothing could be better than this
Don’t stop now

Nothing could be better than this

[Actually, well, there are a few things I can think of that might be better.]

Surprise!  You endured reading that, but there’s also a YouTube video:

See.  It’s fun.

- - - -

Posted on March 5, 2008
Filed Under Music | 15 Comments

Comments

15 Responses to “‘Paradise’ Ana Serrano van Der Laan (Ana Laan) ~ iTunes Single of the Week”

  1. samara on March 8th, 2008 11:26 am

    maní…not money or my knee, maní means peanut. she’s saying she can’t sleep until she eats a cucurucho de maní…a cone of peanut icecream, i believe. the language is spanish. thought you might want to know!!

  2. Cody on March 8th, 2008 1:13 pm

    Thank you, Samara. I didn’t really think she was talking about money or knees, but my Spanish is terrible. I was hoping someone would pick up and offer a translation.

  3. Joey on March 10th, 2008 10:48 pm

    So although I must agree with samara, I gotta give it to you for coming up with Costa Rica, money and my knee. Nice! I first heard this song on iTunes — free single, and I’ve already gone out looking for her CD. Nice and catchy! Good job with the English portion of the lyrics! :)

  4. Me on March 12th, 2008 7:58 pm

    I like this song! especially the sheep part that you mention. I was lol when I saw the money and the knee. I’m glad Samara cleared that out. :)

  5. Ferrell on April 24th, 2008 6:38 am

    I don’t speak Spanish but the tune she segues into at the “mani” point is an old Stan Kenton standard called “The Peanut Vendor” or “El Manisero” by Moises Simons. I recognized the song immediately.

  6. Viqui on May 24th, 2008 5:20 pm

    the spanish part sais: “caserita no te acuestes a dormir sin comer un cucurucho de maní”, and it’s a part of another popular song in centro america called “el manisero”, caserita comes to be a sort of housekeeper or housewife.it was fun finding your translation. thanks for the lyric, anyway.

  7. Martha on May 24th, 2008 9:53 pm

    The spanish part is
    Mani,mani
    Caserita no te acuestes a dormir, sin comer un cucurucho de
    mani, mani
    mani,
    caserita no te acuestes a dormir, sin comer un cucurucho de mani

  8. Rina on June 4th, 2008 11:21 pm

    lmao!
    I don’t care what the real spanish part was, your comments to the lyrics were hilarious!

    realllly made my night 😀

  9. Tipilit on June 19th, 2008 6:08 pm

    Rina…it seems your night is reallllly easily
    (ea-silly?) made

  10. Andrew on October 20th, 2008 1:16 pm

    I disagree with your review.
    First, this song’s floating groove is a lot more complicated than you think. She’s using bossa nova and bolero backbeats and picks up a swing lilt in the skat interlude.
    Second, this song is not about mindless pleasure and cheap songwriting. It’s an intentionally graphic sexcapade intended to prove her recovery from a difficult divorce with her ex husband, the incredible Uruguayan songwriter Jorge Drexler. The rest of the songs on the album are dark and vengeful, so Paradise is where she steps out and shows she’s moved on.
    Finally, I think in order to appreciate the song you have to understand that English is Ana Laan’s 4th language. Most of her writing is in Spanish, and on her albums she switches between languages in the middle of phrases, which I don’t think I’ve ever seen anyone do.

    Until you can recognize (if not understand) Spanish and differentiate Ana Laan’s complicated cross tempos from Paris Hilton’s pathetic reggae, be careful which songs you choose to review.

  11. Cody on October 20th, 2008 4:26 pm

    Andrew, thanks for the comment. You sound like you actually might know Ana personally. I’m sure she’s an amazing, thoughtful, and cosmopolitan person.

    I should point out that the point of this blog is to showcase that great artists often don’t stand out in any language because they focus on trite images of unrealistic places of “paradise.” Ana is clearly far more talented than Paris Hilton; unfortunately, this song is undistinguished to the untrained ear and appeals only to our inner teenage girl.

    Indeed, Paris is in the news again today because she suddenly likes London and wants to stick around. Ana has been out of the spotlight since her week of iTunes fame and a quick run in a television commercial. Paris is still probably worried about picking up the predominant language of the UK.

    With respect to the non-English portions of this song, I was actually making fun of my own inability to speak such an important language as Spanish. Most of the other comments picked up on this, but I clearly offended you early on. So, I apologize.

    Finally, if you are looking for an artist that changes languages, you might revisit my post to learn about Sally Nyolo.

  12. Andrew on October 22nd, 2008 2:17 pm

    hey, thanks for your thoughtful response. I’ll check out Sally Nyolo. I’m actually just getting into Ana Laan after following Jorge Drexler for a long time.

  13. Hispaniola on November 30th, 2008 7:54 am

    “Paradise” plays with the traditions of bolero and bossa nova, and “El manisero” is a traditional Cuban song from the 50’s. Ana Laan blends various traditions and influences in this song and provides ironical lyrics that rewrite those of all these musical genres that are so important in the Latin /Hispanic / Brazilian musical cultural environment. Obviously, you should be acquainted with it to make sense of this funny song. Imagine someone judging the Beatles just for the silly part of “yeah yeah yeah” in “She loves you” …

  14. Britta on September 9th, 2009 11:38 am

    This is a very catchy little tune that I have to admit caught my attention from the commercial (for deodorant i think?). I’m a little upset that I never knew this was a free iTunes song as I paid for the download. But, I’m happy I tried to look up the lyrics for it because otherwise I may not have seen this. This made my day. I was having a bad day and seriously needed a laugh. However, if you do enjoy music like this, you should also check out artists like Madelyn Peyroux and Mirah. Very good artists with somewhat similar sounding voices and styles. Cheers!

  15. ana1 on July 26th, 2010 1:37 pm

    fantastic description of the letter… i loved it! fantastic song 😀

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